Tag Archives: Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours

After busy days of shopping, planning and preparation, Thanksgiving Day is a time to relax and enjoy sharing thanks with our family members and close friends. And hopefully, this special day is topped off with a delicious turkey dinner!

Families are what Nino Salvaggio’s is all about. Both yours AND ours. After all, we’re a local, family-owned business! And we consider each of our employees an extended part of the Nino’s family.

So while you’re enjoying your day of thanks with your family, we’re thanking our Nino’s employee family members by giving them this day to be with their loved ones.

 

Holiday Hours:

 

Wednesday, November 27th, Thanksgiving Eve: 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

 

Thanksgiving Day: Closed

 

Friday, November 29th: Re-open at 8:00 a.m.

 

Until then, we hope to see you at Nino’s for all your special Thanksgiving shopping needs. And from our family to yours, we wish you a VERY Happy Thanksgiving!

 

A Friendly Thanksgiving Reminder From Nino’s

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we know it’s challenging to remember ALL of the things on your TO DO list. There’s much to do as you get ready for one of THE most important family meals on the holiday calendar.

So we’re here to give you a friendly reminder to place YOUR order for that special turkey or ham that’s going to be front and center on your dinner table on Thanksgiving Day.

This year, we’ve got TWO easy ways for you to order.

You can call the Nino’s Butcher Shop and place your order

St. Clair Shores        586-778-3650
Troy                         248-879-9222
Clinton Township     586-412-6000

OR

You can place your reservation online

and our Nino’s Meat Department will have your order ready on the day you want to pick it up.  You won’t even have to deal with getting your credit card out!

You’ll just pay for your order when you stop in to pick it up!

You can choose from any of the following selections–all of which are sold uncooked and ready for your special touches. Or you can choose one of Nino’s “Oven Ready” products, which are prepared and seasoned, with the stuffing on the side ready to pop in your oven. It’s our SUPER-convenient option!

  • Fresh Amish Turkey
  • Fresh Bell & Evans Turkey
  • Oven-Ready Amish Turkey
  • Oven-Ready Turkey Breast (Bone In)
  • Oven-Ready Turkey Breast (Boneless)
  • Turkey Breast
  • Dearborn Spiral-Sliced, Fire-Glazed Hams (half & whole)
  • Winter’s Spiral-Sliced Hams (half only)

Hey! What could be simpler?  Bet you wish Thanksgiving was tonight!

And while you’re thinking of it, be sure to check out Chef Pete’s blog and our Nino’s You Tube channel  for tips and helpful ideas to make this year’s FEAST the best!

And here are the direct links to some of the highlights:

 

Thanksgiving Dinner: Picking Sides

AnnetteBlack Friday deals, cooking way too much food and the onslaught of family can easily overshadow the true meaning of this holiday. However, the centerpiece of Thanksgiving is a large meal, generally centered around a large, roasted turkey. The majority of the side dishes are something of a ritual or a tradition.

Many people would say their meal is incomplete without cranberry sauce, dressing or stuffing and gravy. Others would argue that mashed potatoes, yams or sweet potatoes are required in their traditional meal.  When it comes to vegetables, corn on the cob, green bean casserole and carrots are some of the top prepared items. Round out your feast with deviled eggs, a relish tray complete with pickles and olives, a salad, and bread or biscuits, and you’ll definitely find yourself in a food coma. The dessert for the feast usually consists of pies, in particular apple, pumpkin, sweet potato, pecan or mincemeat.

When it comes to potatoes, mashed potatoes are the poster child of Thanksgiving side dishes. Besides butter and salt and pepper, many people today will prepare theirs with sour cream, garlic and herbs, bacon, or other flavorful additions. Alternatives to mashed potatoes include roasted potatoes, baked potatoes or sweet potatoes prepared in a variety of ways.

For some, meat pies are a staple at the Thanksgiving table. Meat pies are filled with ground pork or mincemeat, with a combination of spices and gravy. Although not real big in our local area, our Canadian friends will more than likely have a meat pie on their tables.

When it comes to vegetables, the green bean casserole is the most likely go-to for accompaniment.  The casserole consists of creamy green beans covered with crunchy fried onions or matchstick potatoes.  However, roasted vegetables make another classic yet savory side dish.  Oven roasting is a healthy way to include seasonal vegetables, as very little oil or fat is needed for cooking.  You can roast a variety of vegetables, including carrots, broccoli, mushrooms, parsnips, butternut squash and Brussels sprouts, on a large baking tray with a little olive oil and seasonings. Roast them until they’re crisp and golden brown.

Turkey and Sides

No Thanksgiving would be complete without stuffing. Whether it is cooked inside or outside of the bird, it is served alongside the turkey. Stuffing can be made from any variety of bread, including purchased bread crumbs. For a gluten-free stuffing, use homemade cornbread prepared with corn flour rather than a boxed mix. Family traditions will have additional ingredients, including pork sausage, turkey sausage, apples, nuts, broth, wine and even eggs.

Maureen Sisco, our Director of Personnel at Nino’s, states that her Thanksgiving meal would be incomplete without sweet potatoes. Her favorite recipe consists of the sweet treat served in a cored-out orange. In my home, our traditional yam recipe is simple, yet no one prepares yams like my mom.  Try as I might, I have never been able to replicate them.  My mom knows this is the one thing she will always be responsible to prepare for our family gatherings.

Chef Joe McDiarmid of Troy has a recipe for stuffing that completes his family’s Thanksgiving meal. Here is the recipe he would like to share:

Chef Joe’s Michigan Stuffing

½ loaf of rye or pumpernickel bread – large diced 1” x 1”

½  loaf of any white bread – large diced 1” x 1” – day old is preferred
½ cup of cream
1 cup of chicken or turkey broth
1 cup diced celery
1 cup diced onion
2 cups dried Michigan cherries
1 cup of pine nuts
1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped
2 tablespoon parsley, chopped
Salt and pepper
½ pound of butter, medium diced

  1. Saute celery and onions until translucent.  Add stock, cream, sage, and parsley, and bring to a simmer.
  2. Mix in both kinds of bread.
  3. Let rest about 20 minutes.
  4. Mix in butter, cherries, pine nuts, salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Place in casserole dish, and bake in 350-degree oven for 30 minutes covered and then uncovered for 10 minutes.

 Interesting Turkey Trivia

  • Turkeys can have heart attacks. Entire fields of turkeys have been known to drop dead from the loud noise of Air Force jets breaking the sound barrier while on test flights.
  • The long, loose skin that hangs down on a turkey’s neck is called a wattle.
  • Turkeys can run up to 20 mph.
  • Wild turkeys can fly, but domestic turkeys cannot.

This holiday season,  I am thankful for the people in my life who give me the support and love I need to make a difference.  What are you thankful for?

 

Turkey Timeline: Your Thanksgiving Dinner Planner

It’s just about 4 weeks until the big bird (the plump one, not the tall one) makes its appearance at our dinner tables, so it’s not too early to start some preparations for what many consider the most elaborate, time-consuming and stressful meal on their holiday calendar.

A little planning can really go a long way in helping you avoid all the stress and anxiety you may have had in years past, such as realizing on Thanksgiving Day that you don’t have enough place settings, cream for the coffee, or ice for the drinks.

Because most home kitchens were never designed to accommodate the volume of food they’ll prepare on this one special day, it’s especially difficult.

And the pressure is especially on if you’re cooking for a big crowd.

This is the one meal of the year you want to get right.

That’s why pre-planning is SO important. As an old chef mentor of mine always said, “Plan your work, and work your plan.”

Having said that, below is my 3-Week Turkey Dinner Timeline to help keep you organized and on track all the way through Thanksgiving.

It’s something you might want to print off and tape to the inside of your kitchen cupboard.

3 Weeks Out

 

  1. The guest list is created and finalized.

    1. Likes and dislikes

    2. Food allergies

  2. Write down your menu with ALL the fixin’s.

    1. Mark which dishes you KNOW you’re personally going to prepare and items your guests may be asked to or want to contribute.

    2. Locate those Thanksgiving recipes NOW.

  3. When you know your guest count is finalized, check the cupboards to be sure you have enough:

    1. Place settings

    2. Silverware

    3. Stemware and goblets

    4. Napkins, tablecloths and decorations

IF NOT, and you intend to rent, place your order immediately! If you’ll buy additional pieces, shop for them this week.

2 Weeks Out

 

  1. If you’re going to order a fresh, Amish, or special turkey from Nino’s, do it NOW!

  2. Review your menu and check to see that you have all the appropriate platters and service wares for the turkey and all the sides. In addition, be sure you have all the cookware, casserole dishes, and roasting pans you need.

  3. Place your order for any fresh flowers or arrangements for your Thanksgiving Day table.

1 Week Out

 

  1. If your menu includes homemade cranberry sauce, marmalade, chutneys or marinades, go ahead and make them this week. They’ll last WELL past Thanksgiving!

  2. 1 week out will be your 1st food shopping for Thanksgiving. Buy any beverages this week (coffee, ultra-pasteurized coffee cream, beer, wine, liquor, mixers and all soft drinks). Most can hang out well in the garage or storage space. Also, you can purchase snacks, chips, nuts and dips early and store them in some out-of-the-way place.

  3. Get fuel for the grill, fat for the deep fryer (if you prepare your bird that way) and logs for the fireplace (if you have one, of course).

  4. 1 week out is also the time to start banking (saving) your cubed ice from your freezer unless you intend to buy a large bag the day before Thanksgiving.

  5. SEE ADDITIONAL 2 WEEK OUT TIPS BELOW

3 Days Out

 

  1. If possible, do all your major shopping today to avoid the Tuesday and Wednesday rush. If you purchase a frozen turkey, leave it in its sealed package, immerse it in cold water, remove it from the water before you go to bed and place it in the refrigerator until Wednesday evening. Your produce (onions, celery, sweet potatoes, Idaho potatoes) and dairy products will all be fine for Thanksgiving if bought today.

  2. Don’t forget the foil, plastic wrap, extra trash liners and paper towels, and be sure the knives are sharp!

The Day Before

 

  1. Last-minute purchases:

    1. Bake or buy your pumpkin/pies and any other desserts

    2. Rolls and breads

  2. Chill the beer and buy your additional ice (unless you’ve banked some), and pick up rentals and any floral pieces for your table.

  3. Set the table, turn the wares upside down (glasses too).

  4. Peel your whole potatoes, place them in cold water, and refrigerate until the morning. Or take it one step further and finish today for re-heating tomorrow (see below).

  5. If you don’t intend to stuff your bird, prepare your stuffing today with strong turkey or chicken stock, just the way you like it. Place in a buttered casserole dish for baking tomorrow.

  6. If you make a green bean and mushroom casserole, you can fully assemble it today (minus the crispy onion) and place it in the refrigerator overnight.

  7. If you are making a relish or vegetable tray, make it today. Cover it with a clean, damp towel and mummy wrap with plastic film.

  8. Check to see if your turkey is fully thawed. If not, completely immerse it in cold water and allow it to stand overnight in your sink.

  9. If you are brining your turkey, brine 1 hour per pound and begin sometime this afternoon or tonight for tomorrow’s roasting. (Nino’s has a GREAT brining kit!)

Thanksgiving Morning

 

  1. Prep your turkey and get it into the oven. (See Nino’s Turkey Roasting Tips).

  2. Your microwave is your friend today. Use it to reheat/cook stuffing before finishing in your oven. Do the same with the green bean casserole, whipped potatoes and sweet potatoes.

  3. Timing is, of course, critical today. Start preparing sides that are not yet COOKED (whipped potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams), and then move on later to re-heating items that are already cooked (green bean casserole, canned corn).

  4. Rolls are ABSOLUTELY the last thing to be baked (15 minutes before service). Don’t forget to take them out of the oven before you sit down to eat!!

Cooking Clock

OTHER TIME-SAVING TIPS

 

  1. Buy a small turkey two weeks out. Roast the bird, pull the meat and make a nice, rich stock/broth from the carcass, neck, wings and drumsticks. Make all your Thanksgiving gravy right now from this stock, and use some of the giblets and turkey meat in it. Place it in 1-quart freezer containers and freeze until thawing it the day before Thanksgiving. Dice up some of the remaining meat and save it (with perhaps some of the stock) for your turkey stuffing, which you will ALSO make the day before Thanksgiving.

  2. Make your mashed potatoes the day before, place in a ceramic casserole dish and reheat in the microwave oven (covered with plastic wrap), or top with shredded cheese and serve as a mashed potato au gratin by re-heating in the oven.

  3. If you intend to serve a colorful vegetable medley, consider cutting all the vegetables today, and to save space on the range tomorrow, place them in a perforated grilling skillet and grill them on your outdoor grill. A little olive oil and dry herbs (thyme, oregano and basil) tossed in can also make a nice flavor addition.

  4. Sweet Potatoes can be roasted in their skins the day before, chilled, and then peeled on Thanksgiving Day and topped with a bubbly mixture of butter, brown sugar or maple syrup. Pop into a hot oven for 15 to 20 minutes, and you’re good to go.

  5. If you want to pre-portion part of your meal for easier service, consider portioning prepared, cooked stuffing on a buttered casserole dish, thinly carving both dark and white meat turkey, and molding it over the stuffing. Baste it with broth, cover, and then re-heat in an oven or microwave.

Nino’s will be closed on Thanksgiving Day for our extended family of employees to be at home with their own families.

We wish you and your family a VERY Happy Thanksgiving!

Pete’s Talkin’ Turkey! Turkey Tips 2012

Perhaps no other dinner event of the year arrives with as much anticipation and anxiety.

It’s Thanksgiving dinner time once again! Time to hunt down those favorite recipes, find that big platter that you last remember seeing sometime in the spring, and fish out that trusted turkey baster that, by now, has been pushed WAY to the back of the drawer.

And if you’re like most, it’s probably once again time to decide just how “Mr. Tom” will make it from Nino’s to your dinner table…hopefully, well browned, moist, flavorful, and most importantly…
…on time!

Of course, making matters even more complicated are the food media folks with books, magazines, newspapers, radio, and of course, The Food Network. They’re all cheerfully “helping you” with 100 different ways to make the BEST holiday bird EVER, between commercials for every kitchen gadget imaginable.

Thanksgiving is, after all, THE food event of the year! It’s the food media’s Olympics, its Poultry World Series, and the Gastronomic Super Bowl of family dinners all rolled into one. All the while they dazzle you with a parade of celebrity chefs offering you tips, tricks, and tempting recipes till you’re not really sure WHAT to do with your turkey this year!

Amid all this choice, I’d like to offer you some “simple” advice.

Just relax. Enjoy the day, and MOST importantly, keep it simple. It’s just a BIG chicken that takes a little longer to cook. No worries…I’ve done this before; we’ll get through this just fine–and together.

And to that end, I have some simple tips called Helpful Tips for Your Thanksgiving Day Turkey.

To help you buy, handle, prep, brine, and season to finally cooking and serving your holiday bird, I’ve created this series of short videos to give you the best “essentials” with clear explanations and choices.

I also have some additional information for you on alternative stuffing recipes and just what to do with all those Thanksgiving Day leftovers that can help you make many more memorable meals.

So this year, when you stop into Nino’s and pick up your fresh turkey (and your fixin’s), be sure to grab my helpful cooking guides right at the meat counter. You can also find them all online. They’re packed with all the “simple,” professional advice you need to make this year’s Thanksgiving Day Dinner one to be TRULY thankful for.

From our family to yours, the Nino’s Culinary Team–and all of its employees and owners–wishes you a VERY Happy Thanksgiving!

Turkey Timeline: Your Thanksgiving Dinner Planner

It’s just about three weeks until the “other” Big Bird makes its appearance in our homes, and it’s not too early to start preparing for what is, for many, the most elaborate and time-consuming meal on their holiday calendar.

A little planning can really go a long way toward helping you avoid all the stress and anxiety you may have had in years past, such as realizing on Thanksgiving day that you don’t have enough place settings, cream for the coffee or ice for the drinks.
Because most home kitchens were never designed to accommodate the volume of food they’ll be preparing on this one special day, it’s especially difficult.
And the pressure is really on if you’re cooking for a crowd. It’s the one meal of the year you want to get right.
That’s why pre-planning is SO important. As an old chef mentor of mine would always say, “Plan your work, and work your plan.”
So having said that, below is my 3-Week Turkey Dinner Timeline to keep you organized and on track all the way through Thanksgiving.

It’s something you might want to print off and tape to the inside of your kitchen cupboard.

3 Weeks Out

  • The guest list is created and finalized.
    • Likes and dislikes
    • Food allergies
  • Write down your menu with ALL the fixins.
  • Mark which dishes you KNOW you’re personally going to prepare and items your guests may be asked to or want to contribute.
  • Locate those Thanksgiving recipes NOW.
  • When you know your guest count is finalized, check the cupboards to be sure you have enough:
    • Place settings
    • Silverware
    • Stemware and goblets
    • Napkins, tablecloths and decorations

If you intend to rent, place your order immediately! If you plan to buy additional pieces, shop for them this week.

2 Weeks Out

  • If you’re going to order a fresh/Amish or special turkey from Nino’s, do it NOW!
  • Review your menu and check to see that you have all the appropriate platters and service wares for the turkey and all the sides. In addition, be sure you have all the cookware, casserole dishes, and roasting pans.
  • Place your order for any fresh flowers or arrangements for your Thanksgiving Day table.

1 Week Out

  • If your menu includes homemade cranberry sauce, marmalade, chutneys or marinades, go ahead and make them this week. They’ll last WELL past Thanksgiving!
  • 1 week out will be your 1st food shopping for Thanksgiving. Buy any beverages this week (coffee, ultra-pasteurized coffee cream, beer, wine, liquor, mixers and all soft drinks). Most can hang out well in the garage or storage space. Also, snacks, chips, nuts and dips can be purchased this early and stored in some out-of-the-way place. Additionally, purchase fuel for the grill, fat for the deep fryer (if you prepare your bird that way) and logs for the fireplace (if you have one, of course).
  • 1 week out is also the time to start “banking” (saving) your cubed ice from your freezer, unless you intend to buy a large bag the day before Thanksgiving.

* SEE ADDITIONAL 2-WEEK-OUT TIPS BELOW

3 Days Out

  • If possible, do all your major shopping today to avoid the Tuesday and Wednesday rush. If you purchase a frozen turkey, leave it in its sealed package, immerse it in cold water, remove it from the water before you go to bed and place it in the refrigerator until Wednesday evening. Your produce (onions, celery, sweet potatoes, Idaho Potatoes and dairy products will all be fine for Thanksgiving if purchased today).

Don’t forget the foil, plastic wrap, extra trash liners and paper towels, and be sure the knives are sharp!

The Day Before

  • Last-minute purchases:
    • Bake or buy your pumpkin pies and all other desserts
    • Get rolls and breads
  • Chill the beer and buy your additional ice (unless you’ve “banked some” and pick up rentals and any floral pieces for your table.
  • Set the table, turn the “wares” upside down (glasses too).
  • Peel your whole potatoes, place them in cold water and refrigerate them until the morning (or take it one step further and finish them today for re-heating tomorrow–see below).
  • If you don’t intend to stuff your bird, prepare your stuffing today with strong turkey or chicken stock, just the way you like it, and place in a buttered casserole dish for baking tomorrow.
  • If you make a green bean and mushroom casserole, you can fully assemble it today (minus the crispy onion) and place it in the refrigerator overnight.
  • If you are making a relish or vegetable tray, make it today; cover it with a clean, damp towel and mummy-wrap with plastic film.
  • Check to see if your turkey is fully thawed. If not, completely immerse it in cold water and allow it to stand overnight in your sink.
  • If you are brining your turkey, brine one hour per pound and begin sometime this afternoon or tonight for tomorrow’s roasting (Nino’s has a GREAT brining kit!).

Thanksgiving Morning

  • Prep your turkey and get it into the oven (See Nino’s Turkey Roasting Tips).
  • Your microwave is your friend today. Use if to reheat/cook stuffing before finishing it in your oven. Do the same with the green bean casserole, whipped potatoes and sweet potatoes.
  • Timing is critical today. Start preparing sides that are not yet COOKED (whipped potatoes, sweet potatoes/yams). Move on later to re-heating items that are already cooked (green bean casserole, canned corn).
  • Rolls are ABSOLUTELY the last item to be baked (15 minutes before service–don’t forget to take them out of the oven before you sit down to eat!)

OTHER TIME-SAVING TIPS

  • Buy a small turkey 2 weeks out. Roast the bird, pull the meat and make a nice, rich stock/broth from the carcass, neck, wings and drumsticks. Make all your Thanksgiving gravy right now, from this stock, and use some of the giblets and turkey meat in it. Place it in one-quart freezer containers and freeze until thawing it the day before Thanksgiving. Dice up some of the remaining meat and save it (with perhaps some of the stock) for your turkey stuffing, which you will ALSO make the day before Thanksgiving.
  • Make your mashed potatoes the day before, place them in a ceramic casserole dish and reheat them in the microwave oven (covered with plastic wrap), or top with shredded cheese and serve as a mashed potato Au gratin by re-heating in the oven.
  • If you intend to serve a colorful vegetable medley, consider cutting all the vegetables today, and to save space on the range tomorrow, place them in a perforated grilling skillet and grill them on your outdoor grill. A little olive oil with dried herbs (thyme, oregano and basil) tossed in can also make a nice flavor addition.
  • Sweet potatoes can be roasted in their skins the day before, chilled, and then peeled on Thanksgiving Day, and topped with a bubbly mixture of butter and brown sugar or maple syrup. Pop into a hot oven for 15 to 20 minutes, and you’re good to go.

If you want to pre-portion part of your meal for easier service, consider portioning prepared, cooked stuffing on a buttered casserole dish, thinly carving both dark and white meat turkey and molding it over the stuffing, basting it with broth, covering it, and then re-heating it in an oven or microwave oven.

Nino’s will be closed on Thanksgiving Day to allow our extended family of employees to be at home with their own families.

We wish you and your family a VERY Happy Thanksgiving!

Time to Brine?

Right at this time of the year, you start hearing a lot about brining your turkey. It’s on the Food Network, on the morning news, in newspapers and in every food-related magazine at the checkout line from October through November.

Chefs love brining just about as much as they love being the expert on the subject every season. And every chef you talk to has favorite techniques and recipes. And for good reason; it works!

The bottom line is brining is good. It can’t hurt your turkey; it can only help it.

Brining isn’t only used for turkeys. It is also used with other poultry and pork. Pickles are also brined, albeit with a slightly acidic one, and pickles, unlike meats, aren’t cooked afterwards.

So just what is brining, and why will my turkey be better?

Brines don’t tenderize. Rather, brining is an age-old technique used to moisten and flavor meats prior to roasting. Quite simply, what brine does is hydrate, and in some cases (like Nino’s), it gives the meat an additional flavor boost, which after cooking, results in a juicier, more flavorful turkey.

Is there anything different I have to do after brining?

Nope, you can roast, deep fry or grill your turkey as you would have done otherwise (although we recommend that you check out our enclosed Nino’s Turkey Roasting Tips if you choose to roast).

So how do I brine my turkey?

It’s simple, and to make it even easier, Nino’s has JUST introduced our new Turkey Brining Kit. It makes brining your turkey as easy as turning on your faucet (You knew this was coming, didn’t you?).

For $9.99, you get EVERYTHING you need to brine your turkey, including ALL the brine seasonings, a heavy-duty turkey brining bag and instructions. We’ve even thrown in a copy of our popular Turkey Roasting Tips!

We have two flavors for you to choose from: Savory Herb and Apple Spice. BOTH are traditional brine flavors and BOTH are delicious. All you have to do is add 2 gallons of water and a turkey, brine for about 1 hour per pound and you’re done.

Really…it doesn’t get much simpler than that!

We’re looking forward to having you try these two new brining flavors this year when it’s Turkey Time. We think you’ll agree that the Time to Brine is THIS YEAR!