Tag Archives: Gluten-Free

Orange Mint

Orange Mint
Colorful, delicious, refreshing and a wonderful addition to sparkling water or a rum drink.
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Ingredients
  1. 3 Naval Oranges
  2. 2 Tbsp. Granulated Sugar
  3. 3 Tbsp. Chopped Fresh Mint
Instructions
  1. Peel off rind by hand in large panels. Scrape off the interior white pith of the rind and then dice rind into ¼” squares.
  2. Poach orange rind squares in water for 3 minutes, discard water then poach again in new water for 3 minutes. Drain off all water and reserve rind pieces.
  3. Squeeze juice from oranges and stir in sugar until dissolved.
  4. Place approximately ½ teaspoon of fresh mint and a few squares of the orange rind in each ice cube compartment. Top off with the orange juice mixture and freeze.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Fresh Michigan Sweet Corn Custard

Fresh Michigan Sweet Corn Custard
Serves 8
August and early September are THE two best months to enjoy the best sweet corn Michigan farmers have to offer.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 ears Michigan Sweet Corn, Shucked
  2. 1 Qt. Heavy Whipping Cream
  3. ½ cup Granulated Sugar
  4. ½ tsp. Sea or Kosher Salt
  5. 1 tsp. Pure Vanilla Extract (or Paste)
  6. 2 Extra-Large Eggs
  7. 6 Extra-Large Egg Yolks
Instructions
  1. Strip the kernels from the cobs, and while doing so, scrape down any of the cob’s juices with a knife. Cut the cobs in half, and place all into a medium-size saucepan with the cream, sugar and salt. Stir and set aside for a few hours.
  2. After the mixture has rested, place it in a medium-size saucepan, (with the cobs still in) bring it to a boil and then immediately remove it from the heat. Transfer the hot mixture into a separate storage container or bowl, and refrigerate it until cool.
  3. Preheat the oven to 275°F.
  4. In a medium-size bowl, beat together the eggs, the yolks and the vanilla extract.
  5. Discard the corn cobs from the cream mixture and then blend it until smooth with a food processor, immersion stick blender or a traditional blender.
  6. Slowly add the beaten egg mixture to corn mixture while continuing to blend.
  7. Strain this finished mixture through a fine-mesh sieve (or strainer) into a bowl.
  8. Place eight 4-ounce ramekins (or custard cups) in a deep baking dish, and then divide the custard mixture among them.
  9. Add enough water to the baking dish (1 to 2 cups) to create some moisture. Cover loosely with aluminum foil and bake for about 45 minutes, turning the dish around about halfway through the baking time to ensure even heat.
  10. When the corn custard gently springs back to the touch, remove the pan from the oven and the ramekins from the water bath.
  11. Lightly cover the ramekins with plastic film to prevent a skin (like a pudding gets) and refrigerate approximately 3 to 4 hours or until fully chilled.
  12. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. Makes approximately 8 – ½ Cup Custards
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Seafood Sausages

Seafood Sausages
Serves 6
The recipe below allows you to add whatever additional seafood garnishes you wish into the general mixture. Follow the recipe and either use my garnish or choose other seafood in its place (using the same total amount).
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Ingredients
  1. 1 Cup Fresh Scallops (sea are cheaper), Patted Dry
  2. 1 Cup Raw Shrimp, Patted Dry
  3. 1 Egg White
  4. 1 Cup Heavy Whipping Cream
  5. Pinch Salt
  6. Pinch Ground White Pepper
  7. ½ tsp. Granulated or Powdered Garlic
For Garnish
  1. ½ tsp. Crushed Red Pepper Flakes
  2. 1 Tbsp. Parsley Flakes
  3. ½ Cup Red Bell Pepper, Minced, Patted Dry
  4. ½ Cup Green Onion, Finely Chopped
  5. 1 Cup Raw Shrimp, Chopped Fine
  6. 1 Cup Lobster or Alaskan Crab, Chopped Fine
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, puree scallops and shrimp to a fine paste.
  2. Add the egg white and blend 1 minute.
  3. Add WELL-CHILLED heavy whipping cream in a slow stream while blending. This should take about 1 minute in total.
  4. Add salt, pepper and garlic. Pulse a moment or two to mix in.
  5. Turn mixture out of the food processor into an appropriately sized mixing bowl, and then stir in all of the garnish ingredients until they are evenly distributed.
  6. Place a piece of 12” wide x 15” long (approximately) plastic film on a clean, flat work surface. At one of the narrow ends, portion the mixture about 1” away from the edge to create a broomstick-like diameter of mixture, leaving about 2” of space on both sides with no filling. On a 12” wide film, this would make the filling about 8” long and about 1” in diameter.
  7. Fold the bottom inch over the filling and roll the broomstick forward (keeping the plastic film taught) until you reach the end of the film.
  8. Repeat this procedure until all of the mixture is used.
  9. Next, you will want to gather the excess film at both ends just before the portioned sausage filling begins. Tighten the sausage link by pinching each end closed and then rolling the link along the counter using the friction of the counter to form each sausage link into a firm tube.
  10. Carefully secure each tightened end with a twist tie or rubber band to keep each link firm.
  11. *TIP: If you see air pockets in your links you can improve the final look of your sausages by taking a small needle and puncturing the air pocket with a small prick of the needle.
  12. After all of your links have been made, poach them together in BARELY simmering water approximately 15 minutes or until they are firm. DO NOT OVERCOOK. If you over-poach your links, you will see them puffing up.
  13. Chill links in a bath of ice water for 15 to 20 minutes to firm them up before cutting. You can even prepare these a day ahead of your intended use.
  14. Before cooking your sausages, I recommend you unwrap then cut them into 2” (maximum 3”) pieces at a slight angle.
  15. Lastly, sauté them in butter (or garlic butter) in a non-stick skillet over medium-high heat until re-heated through. You can brown them ever so lightly, but I do not recommend browning them.
Notes
  1. Makes about 6 cups or 6 – 10” x 1” Diameter Sausages
  2. Feeds Approximately 6 Persons with Pasta
Serving Suggestion
  1. I enjoy my seafood sausages over linguine, with my Lobster Sauce recipe, my Mediterranean Style Seafood Marinara Sauce recipe or even a white clam sauce.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Peanut Butter & Cream Cheese Dip

Peanut Butter & Cream Cheese Dip
This recipe goes great with crisp apples, pears, ... even celery!
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Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup Nino's Homemade Peanut Butter
  2. 1/2 cup Cream Cheese, softened
  3. 3 Tbsp. Brown Sugar
  4. 1/2 tsp. Vanilla Extract
  5. Pinch of Cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Place all of the ingredients in a food processor and blend until creamy.
Notes
  1. For a lighter, fluffier dip, just add a bit of milk or water.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Pineapple & Cilantro Salad

Pineapple & Cilantro Salad
Serves 4
This member of the carrot family is also referred to as Chinese Parsley, Coriander and Dhania (in the Indian subcontinent, and increasingly in Britain) and is actually the leaves (and stems) of the Coriander plant. Cilantro (from the Spanish name for the plant) has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking. The Cilantro leaves look a bit like flat Italian parsley and in fact are related. The leaves, and especially the stems, have a very different taste from the seeds, similar to parsley but “juicier” and with citrus-like overtones. Some people instead perceive a spicy or “soapy” taste. This taste is believed to be a result of an enzyme that changes the way some people’s taste buds perceive the flavor of coriander leaves. Cilantro leaves and stems are best if chopped and added to a dish just before finishing to take full advantage of their unique flavor.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 Fresh Pineapple, peeled, cored
  2. 1 Red Bell Pepper, julienned
  3. 1/2 Red Onion, sliced 1/4"
  4. 2 Garlic Cloves, chopped
  5. 1/4 cup Cilantro, coarsely chopped
  6. 1 Tbsp. Jalapeno, with seeds, minced
  7. 1 Lime, juiced
  8. 2 Tbsp. Honey
  9. 2 Tbsp. Sesame Oil
  10. 1 tsp. Black Sesame Seeds
  11. To Taste - Salt & Pepper
Instructions
  1. Chop pineapple into small bite size pieces and place in a non-reactive bowl.
  2. Add all remaining ingredients.
  3. Cover and chill.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Pickled Hungarian Wax Peppers

Pickled Hungarian Wax Peppers
Serves 4
The Hungarian Yellow Wax Pepper, ‘Capsicum annuum’, is an Old World favorite that is the perfect pick for pickled peppers and pepper jelly. This pepper is also known as the Hot Banana Pepper which it is not but it is closely related. The Hungarian Yellow Wax pepper was developed in Hungary and has a waxy color that resembles bees’ wax. The Wax peppers are actually orange-red when ripe, but are usually pickled while still yellow. Hungarian Yellow Wax peppers have thin walls and the peppers are usually used fresh in salads, pickled, fried, canned or roasted. Hungarian wax peppers are medium hot, with heat scores that range between 5,000 and 15,000 Scoville heat units.
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Ingredients
  1. 4 lbs. Hungarian Wax Peppers
  2. 3 lbs. Red & Green Bell Peppers, mixed
  3. 5 cups Cider Vinegar (5% acidity)
  4. 1 cup Water
  5. 4 tsp. Canning or Pickling Salt (or Kosher)
  6. 3 Tbsp. Granulated Sugar
  7. 2 cloves Garlic, fresh
  8. 1 cup Sweet Onions
Instructions
  1. Wash peppers. If small peppers are left whole, slash two to four slits in each; quarter large peppers.
  2. Blanch in boiling water 1 minute, then shock in ice water and peel off skins. Flatten small peppers.
  3. Fill sterilized jars, leaving a ½ inch headspace.
  4. Combine and heat other ingredients to boiling and simmer 10 minutes.
  5. Remove garlic and onion.
  6. Add hot pickling solution over peppers, leaving ½ inch headspace.
  7. Adjust lids and process pints or half-pints for 10 minutes in a boiling water bath at an altitude of less than 1000 feet or for 15 minutes at an altitude of 1001 to 3000 feet.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Pear & Horseradish Sauce

Pear & Horseradish Sauce
Cultivated for over 3 thousand years and believed to be native of Central Europe, Horseradish is related to the mustard family, hence its biting flavor and aroma. The “horse” in horseradish refers to the size of the root (up to 6 feet) and its pungency. Thus the name was adopted so as to distinguish it from other radishes. Horseradish has found its way into the Cuisine of many cultures, particularly Jewish, and on the European Continent. Additionally, since real wassabi is very expensive, even in Japan, most Japanese restaurants around the world actually serve a horseradish mixture that’s been dyed green. In fact, the Japanese botanical name for horseradish is seiyōwasabi (セイヨウワサビ, seiyōwasabi?), or “Western wasabi”. Commercial cultivation in America began in the mid 1850’s, when immigrants started horseradish farms in the Midwest. By the late 1890’s, a thriving horseradish industry had developed in an area of fertile soil on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River. Today, approximately 6 million gallons of prepared horseradish are produced annually in the U.S. – enough to generously season sandwiches to reach 12 times around the world.
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Ingredients
  1. 4 Pears, ripe
  2. 1/3 cup Horseradish, fresh, grated
  3. 2 Tbsp. Honey
  4. 1/4 cup Cider Vinegar
  5. 1/3 cup Golden Raisins
  6. 1/4 cup Pecan Pieces, toasted
Instructions
  1. Grate horseradish and immediately mix with the vinegar.
  2. Peel, core and shred pears and add to grated horseradish with honey, golden raisins and toasted pecans.
  3. Serve as a sauce with roasted meats & it goes particularly well with pork.
Notes
  1. Makes approximately 2 1/2 cups.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Parsley Root Soup

Parsley Root Soup
Serves 4
Parsley the herb needs no introduction; but what might is the version that is grown not for its leaves but for its root, which is used in a culinary sense much like any other root, such as parsnips. Also called Hamburg Parsley and Turnip-Rooted Parsley, this parsley subspecies is grown for its beige, carrot-like root which tastes like a cross between a carrot and celery. It’s used in parts of Europe in soups, stews and simply as a vegetable. The ancestral wild parsley is thought to have arisen on the island of Sardinia. The Greeks and the Romans used parsley leaf much as we still do today. In mythology, parsley was believed to have sprung from a Greek hero, Archemorous, the forerunner of death; the Greeks crowned the winners at the Isthmian games with parsley, and warriors fed parsley leaves to their horses. Parsley, long in common use all around the Mediterranean, was brought to England and apparently first cultivated there in 1548.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 Tbsp. Butter
  2. 1 Tbsp. Garlic, chopped
  3. 1/2 cup Sweet Onions, sliced
  4. 1 cup Yukon Gold Potatoes, peeled & diced 1"
  5. 1 cup Celery Root, peeled & diced 1"
  6. 4 cups Chicken Stock
  7. 1/4 tsp. Dry Thyme
  8. 1 cup Heavy Cream
  9. 2 Tbsp. Fresh Italian Parsley Leaves, chopped
Instructions
  1. Sweat garlic and onion in butter in a medium sauce pan on medium low heat for 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. Add potato, celery root, chicken stock and thyme and simmer approximately 30 minutes or until celery root is tender.
  3. Remove soup from the heat, allow to cool, then puree in blender or food processor until smooth.
  4. Return pureed soup to the sauce pan.
  5. Add cream and simmer 5 minutes.
  6. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve with a garnishment of fresh chopped parsley.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Oyster Mushroom Risotto

Oyster Mushroom Risotto
Serves 6
The Oyster mushroom, or Pleurotus ostreatus, is a common mushroom prized for its edibility. Long cultivated in Asia, it is now cultivated around the world for food. Both the Latin and common name refer to the shape of the mushroom. The Latin pleurotus (sideways) refers to the sideways-growth of the stem with respect to the cap while the Latin ostreatus (and the English common name, oyster) refers to the shape of the cap which resembles the bi-valve of the same name. Many also believe that the name is fitting due to the flavor resemblance to oysters. In Chinese, they are called ping gû (literally “flat mushroom”). Oyster mushrooms are rich in calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, selenium, vitamins A and B.
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Ingredients
  1. 4 Tbsp. Butter
  2. 2 cups Oyster Mushrooms
  3. 4 Shallots, peeled & minced
  4. 2/3 cup Cognac
  5. 7 cups Chicken Stock
  6. 1 3/4 cups Arborio Rice
  7. 1/3 cup Parmesan Cheese, grated
  8. 2 Tbsp. Parsley, fresh, chopped
  9. To Taste - Salt & Pepper
Instructions
  1. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a medium skillet over medium-high heat.
  2. Add shallots and sauté one minute, then add oyster mushrooms and continue to sauté 2 to 3 more minutes to soften.
  3. Add cognac and ignite.
  4. Continue to cook mixture until flames are extinguished and the liquid mixture is reduced by half.
  5. Add the Arborio rice and ¼ of the chicken stock and continuously stir until nearly all the stock has been absorbed into the rice.
  6. Add the remaining chicken stock in 3 more stages while continuously stirring. The mixture will begin to take on a creamy consistency.
  7. Once the last quarter of the chicken stock has been added and the mixture has the consistency of oatmeal, remove from the heat, season with salt and pepper and stir in the Parmesan cheese.
  8. Serve immediately with a chopped parsley garnish.
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/

Orange Ginger Marmalade Sauce

Orange Ginger Marmalade Sauce
This sauce goes exceptionally well with coconut crusted chicken or shrimp and makes an excellent dipping sauce for egg rolls.
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Ingredients
  1. 18 oz. Orange Marmalade
  2. 4 tsp. Prepared Horseradish
  3. 4 tsp. Whole Grain Dijon Mustard
  4. 3 Tbsp. Cider Vinegar
  5. 2 tsp. Ginger Root, minced
  6. 1 tsp. Garlic Cloves, minced
  7. 1 tsp. Jalapeno, minced
  8. 4 tsp. Green Onion, minced
  9. 2 tsp. Cilantro, minced
  10. 4 tsp. Red Bell Peppers, minced
  11. 1/4 tsp. Kosher Salt
Instructions
  1. Stir all ingredients into orange marmalade
  2. Cover and chill.
Notes
  1. A great sauce for Nino's Coconut Chicken!
Nino Salvaggio https://www.ninosalvaggio.com/