Try a Homemade Chutney With Your Roasts

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I don’t know why, but it’s exactly this time of year that I start thinking of chutney as the perfect accompaniment for my roasts.

Maybe it’s because chutney pairs so well with pork and lamb roasts, and it’s exactly this time of the year that both are SO popular in restaurants and for home-cooked meals. No doubt it’s also because Easter is the perfect time to enjoy either of these delicious meats.

Chutney also goes very well with roasted beef, poultry and even grilled fish!

If you’re not that familiar with chutney, or you’ve only tried the jarred variety, you’re in for a real treat if you spend just a little extra time to make some from scratch. It’s quite easy, and the difference in taste and texture is remarkable.

Just what is chutney?

If you’ve never tried chutney, here are the basics:

It’s Chutney 101 if you will.

Chutney is a condiment, a sort of relishy sauce traditionally served with roasted meats. There are many different recipes to make chutney, but what they mostly have in common are fruits (dried and/or fresh), which are slowly cooked in a spicy, sweet, tangy sauce created from various sweeteners, vinegar, spices, and of course, the juices from the fruits. Nuts are sometimes used as well.

What results is a delicious marriage of fruits that perfectly complements roasts, whether you choose to serve it hot or chilled.

The most popular chutney is made with mango, but other fruits are just as delicious.

Below, I have three different recipes for you, and I love each of them. The 1st is made with pears and pairs this chutney with roasted or grilled teriyaki chicken.

Pear Chutney with Fresh Ginger & Sesame

Yields approximately 4 cups or 8 servings

Ingredients:

4 Cups Bosc or Bartlett Pears, Peeled, Cored and Diced ½ inch (4 cups = about 4 pears)
2 TBSP Sesame Oil
½ Cup Raisins, Dark
½ Cup Cherries, Sun-Dried
3 ea Garlic Cloves, Chopped
2 tsp Ginger, Fresh, Grated
¼ Cup Red Onion, Cut ½ inch
¼ Cup Green Onion, Cut in ¼-inch bias cuts
1 tsp Salt, Kosher
1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper
1 Cup Cider Vinegar
1 Cup Sugar, Granulated
½ Cup Brown Sugar
1 TBSP Toasted Sesame Seeds

Method:

  1. In a heavy saucepan, over medium-high heat, sauté apples in butter until lightly browned.
  2. Add all remaining ingredients and bring to a simmer.
  3. Simmer very gently on low heat until mixture thickens.
  4. Remove saucepan from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
  5. Stir in toasted sesame seeds. Serve or refrigerate.

Apples and pork are natural partners, which is why I love apple chutney with my roasted pork entrees. This recipe also has some dried fruits, which add complexity and interest to the final taste.

Apple Chutney

Yields approximately 4 cups or 8 servings

Ingredients:

4 Cups Apples, Granny Smith, Peeled, Cored and Diced ½ inch (about 4 apples)
2 TBSP Butter, Salted
1 Cup Diced, Mixed Dry Fruits (apricot, pear, peach, mango, pineapple, raisin, cherries)
3 ea Garlic Cloves, Chopped
1 tsp Ginger, Fresh, Grated
¼ Cup Red Onion, Cut ½ inch
¼ Cup Green Onion, Cut in ¼-inch bias cuts
1 tsp Salt, Kosher
1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper
1 Cup Cider Vinegar
1 Cup Sugar, Granulated
½ Cup Brown Sugar

Method:

  1. In a heavy saucepan, over medium-high heat, sauté apples in butter until lightly browned.
  2. Add all remaining ingredients and bring to a simmer.
  3. Simmer very gently on low heat until mixture thickens.
  4. Remove saucepan from heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
  5. Serve or refrigerate.

Also known as an Indian date, tamarind is the fruit of a tall shade tree native to Asia and Northern Africa and widely grown in India. The large (about 4 inch long) pods contain small seeds and a sour-sweet pulp that, when dried, become extremely sour. In Thailand, it is called makham wan and is eaten fresh as a snack. In Vietnam, it is called nuoc nam. Tamarind is also used as a base for delicious raw or cooked chutneys, its fruity acidity combining well with sugar, chilies and other flavors. This recipe combines tamarind with mango and a touch of onion, garlic, fresh ginger and curry to make a delicious accompaniment to grilled chicken, pork or steak-type fish.

Mango & Sweet Tamarind Chutney

Makes 3 Cups or 6 Servings

Ingredients:

3 each Red Mango, Peeled, Cut ½-inch dice
2 TBSP Sesame Oil
½ Cup Red Onion, Cut in ¼-inch dice
6 each Tamarind Pods, Seeded, Pulp ONLY
2 tsp Jalapeno Pepper, Seeded, Minced
2 ea Limes, Juiced
1 tsp Garlic, Fresh, Minced
¼ Cup Brown Sugar
1 tsp Ginger, Fresh, Minced
1 tsp Curry Powder
½ Cup Raisins, Whole
1 Cup Water
¼ Cup Green Onions, Cut 1/4 pieces
2 TBSP Cilantro, Leaves, Chopped

Method:

  1. Mash or mince tamarind pulp.
  2. In a saucepan, heat sesame oil and sauté red onion, jalapeno, garlic, ginger, raisins and green onions for 5 minutes or until softened.
  3. Add all remaining ingredients and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes to partially cook and soften the mango, reduce the liquids to a syrup and meld all the flavors together.
  4. Serve warm or cold.